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2000 Summer Confchem: The Use of Computer Simulations in General Chemistry

05/12/00 to 06/06/00


 

Conference Organizer:    Dr Denis Bussi√®res, Professeur de chimie, UQAC,
555 Boul. Universite,
Chicoutimi, Qc. CANADA   G7H 2B1
dbussier@uqac.uquebec.ca

 

Schedule

Session A: May 12-18, 2000

 

Short questions:
Answers to questions:
Discussion:
Friday, May 12
Monday, May 15
Monday-Thursday, May 15-18


 

A-1 Developing and Implementing Web-based Computer Simulations for In-Class, Individual, and Small Group Work
by Donald E. Mencer, The Pennsylvania State University, Hazleton Campus, Hazleton, PA 18201

 

A-2 Using Technology to Solve the Conceptual Riddle: "How can we help them see what we see?"
by Jimmy Reeves, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC.

 

A-3 Why use animations and simulations?
by Brian Pankuch, Union County College, New Jersey

 

Session B: May 19-May 25, 2000

 

Short questions:
Answers to questions:
Discussion:
Friday, May 19
Monday, May 22
Monday-Thursday, May 22-25


 

B-1 Interactive Simulations for Classroom Use (transferred to paper C-3, see below)
John S. Martin, The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

 

B-2 Computer Animations and Simulations in General Chemistry
by Chung Chieh and Newman K.S. Sze, Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1

 

B-3

Discovery-based General Chemistry Using Chemland Simulations
by Bill Vining, Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4510

 

Session C: May 26 - June 1, 2000

 

Short questions:
Answers to questions:
Discussion:
Friday, May 26
Monday, May 29
Monday-Thursday, May 29-June 1


 

C-1 Using Simulations to Transform the Nature of Chemistry Homework
by David Yaron, Rea Freeland, Donovan Lange, and Jeff Milton, Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA 15213

 

C-2 Computer Simulations and Tutorials for General Chemistry at University of Missouri-Rolla
  -  Class Statistics Addendum (added 5/29/00)
by Gary L. Bertrand, Professor of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65049-0010

 

C-3 Interactive Simulations for Classroom Use
John S. Martin, The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

 

 

 

Conference Articles

Abstracts of Papers:

Leonard C. Klein
Shenandoah Valley Governor's School
Fishersville, VA 22939
klein@svgs.k12.va.us

Abstract:

This paper discusses the authors attempt to provide better feedback on problem sets and a way to provide more different problems for students to work. All students need to learn how to work problems and need to know if their work is correct or not. The author provides one method and briefly discusses others available. Problems encounterd are also discussed. One may ask why one should go through all this work when there are products on the market that will do many of the same things for not much money. One answer is similar to why create your own labbook - using someone elses labbook is like using someone else's toothbrush. This allows one to ask questions the way you want and the way your students will see them on a test or quiz.